A Good Physical Therapist Is Pro-Active

Many people think of physical therapy as the follow-up activity their GP or orthopedic surgeon often prescribes after an injury, or an inquiry into mystery aches and pains. Certainly that’s one function of PT, but perhaps our most critical function is to be a holistic, preventative health partner for people who want to remain active and healthy throughout their lives.

We loved Dr. Chris Telesmanic’s perspective in his column for The Sentinel.

“The vision for physical therapy moving into the 21st century, as stated by the American Physical Therapy Association, is to ‘transform society by optimizing movement to improve the human experience.’”

Promoting the role of physical therapy as a proactive one focused not only on recovery but on prevention and vitality makes good sense. By nature, human beings are built imperfectly, and even the most fit and athletic among us either suffer from—or very likely will one day—deficiencies in movement based on our unique bone and muscle structure, use (and over-use) patterns, and regular age-related wear and tear. A good physical therapist will take a holistic approach to patient health and mobility, and look closely at the bigger picture to identify these potential problems before they develop.

Including physical therapy in the suite of preventative care services allows us to contribute to a healthier, more functional society—and saves time, money, and unnecessary pain for patients who might otherwise find themselves scrambling to fix and recover from acute problems down the road.

Give our Reno team of physical therapists a call at 775-747-2278 to find out how physical therapy can be an important tool in your arsenal to keep that body active forever!

Pro Tip: Don’t Sacrifice True Health for a Fast Fix

Microwaves, remote controls, TiVo, cell phones, email and instantaneous Internet —the Millennial generation and even the generation before it have never had to think much about waiting. We have so many tools at our disposal to rush just about any process along, that we forget there can be a value to giving things time.  We’re so anxious about saving time, we’ll readily develop technology to help us do it.

Thankfully there’s not an app (yet) for fast-forwarding a sunset, a relaxing glass of wine, or a perfect fall day!

But even those of us who grew up without cell phones and Internet have our hurry-up crutches. Medications like pain-relievers and antibiotics are among them. These treatments can be helpful and sometimes even critical, but as a culture, we’ve gotten ourselves into a habit of popping a pill at the first sign of even minor issues. This can come at a price to our overall health. Antibiotics make us feel better quickly, and we all want to feel better quickly when we’re sick. But antibiotics can also change our gut ecosystems, compromising our immune systems and making us less able to fight off viruses and infection next time. These things can also mask pain and dysfunction, making it difficult to pinpoint the true problem and its behavior.

Our bodies have built-in tools that, paired with help from us, are finely-tuned to help us succeed. When we interrupt those natural processes with medicated shortcuts, we undermine our bodies’ ability to be self-sufficient in healing, and to build up our natural defenses.

At Battle Born Health’s physical therapy center in Reno, our role in healing is working with the body’s natural tools to identify the true source of an injury, learn how it’s affecting the body, and to re-train muscles to perform the way they’re supposed to. In other words, taking time to do things the right way. At Battle Born, you always work directly with a certified physical therapist—no technicians here—on your self-designated goals for getting back on track with sports, work, and other activities you’ve been missing out on. 

Give us a call at775-747-2278 to find out more information about how physical therapy can help you.  

Physical Therapy Lingo: "Aggs and Eases"

In PT-speak, “aggs and eases” refer to the activities and circumstances that aggravate or ease pain. For instance, an “agg” for some patients might be running a mile. An “ease” might be lying down on the couch with an ice pack. In some patients, that might be reversed—a short, easy run might help stretch out tense fascia, or lying down in certain positions might actually increase pain in specific areas.

Part of effective physical therapy is learning what each patient’s own unique aggs and eases are. Paying attention to these factors and their patterns will help your physical therapist learn more about your injury.  

Health care professionals get excited when a patient comes in with textbook symptoms—these are easy cases to solve. Unfortunately they’re also very rare. Most patients exhibit an array of symptoms and issues that we have to work at piecing together in order to start working on solutions. That’s why articles and social media video clips that promote one-size-fits-all cures aren’t helpful, and can sometimes even be dangerous. They don’t take into account the millions of unique sets of “aggs and eases” in a diverse population.  

Fiber is a terrific example. Most studies suggest that everyone should consume 25-30 grams of fiber daily. While many people do just fine and improve their health with higher fiber diets, some people experience painful and debilitating gas and diarrhea when consuming that much fiber, which can then lead to dehydration and other issues.

Exercise is another good example. We all know exercise is a key factor in overall health, but not all exercises are created equal, and not all exercises work for all people. If a 30-minute run sends you straight to the couch with an aching back and a swollen knee, it’s safe to say that running isn’t good for you at this point in time. And a good physical therapist will help to determine why, and based on your unique circumstances, recommend other exercises that can serve as “eases” instead of “aggs.” In essence, a skilled physical therapist can help you investigate the root of your problem and take back control over your own comfort and function—which in turn puts you back in control of your life—through careful consideration of your own set of aggravating triggers and easing activities.